HomeEtherumRoundup of Research and Development Teams Supported by EF

Roundup of Research and Development Teams Supported by EF

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We all have a lot to be thankful for this holiday season, from the first birthday of the beacon chain, to the successful upgrades over the past year and the incredible progress across the entire Ethereum ecosystem. As a highly productive year draws to a close, there are a few final gifts to deliver in the form of updates from many (15+!!) EF-supported teams that are always working to improve the network. And there’s a lot of substantive material here, so take some time to sort through the table of contents, and dig in! As always, this roundup series focuses on EF-supported teams whose members are working to grow and improve Ethereum as a whole. Included in this edition are updates from many teams highlighted in the previous report, and other new and rotating groups. Enjoy! 🦄 Consensus R&D (aka EF Research Team) Authored by Hsiao-Wei Wang In the second half of this year, the milestones in Ethereum consensus R&D included: To align with The Great Renaming, we shifted components to “Consensus Layer” from “Eth2” for clearer communication in the long term. In early 2022, our team will focus on helping to deliver the “The Merge”, the most significant consensus protocol upgrade ever. Fortunately, we have great support from client teams, and others in the community working to make this a reality! In the meantime, we will be continuing our research work on data availability, L1 scaling, and the features of the “clean up” fork after The Merge. Ecosystem Support Program Authored by ESP Team We published our Q2 Allocation Update with grants totalling $7,794,000 for the quarter – and Q3 is coming soon! You can also check out recent monthly roundups here and here for more detailed progress updates from a few of our fabulous grantees. Behind the scenes, we’re working on a major website overhaul which should make it easier than ever to understand ESP’s mission and priorities, and for eligible builders to apply for funding or other support. We can’t wait to launch the new site in early 2022! Ethereum.org Authored by Sam Richards To make our work more accessible and to foster more community collaboration, our team publishes an overview of our quarterly roadmap goals. See our Q4 product roadmap here. Happy holidays to all from the ethereum.org team 😀🎄 As always, our vision with ethereum.org is to create the best portal for Ethereum’s growing community and to serve as the front door to Ethereum for millions of new visitors each month. Content updates Ethereum moves fast! As well as updating hundreds of pages to ensure our content stays up to date and accurate, we’ve also released a bunch of new content: Ethereum.org exists thanks to hundreds of content and code contributors from the community. In Q3/Q4, we put emphasis on ways to increase contributions and acknowledge the community for the work they were doing: Some stats (Aug – Dec) Our GitHub contributors increased by 57%, from 396 to 621 😲Our Discord community nearly doubled, from 6,500 to 12,200 members 🎉We’ve hosted two community calls and started office-hours for contributorsWe added 3 new community guides (trusted members answering questions and moderating chat) 😎We introduced tiered POAPs to gamify contributions for content, code, and translations Translation Program Since hiring our new Translation Lead in July, the Translation Program has really ramped up! Some stats: Between July and November, the community collectively translated 1,373,046 words for ethereum.org, over 10x the amount of this same period last year! To put this in perspective, this is equivalent to translating the entirety of almost 20 books 📚!We’ve received translation support from over 2,500 community contributors 🤯We have 37 languages live on ethereum.org 🌍We launched an initiative to better acknowledge our translators, including a leaderboard and translator certificates! CLR funding We’re supporting a clr.fund round on Layer 2! After over 6 months of contributing to clr.fund’s quadratic funding stack, we’ve merged our changes to the upstream repo, which adds L2 network support and a variety of web app enhancements. clr.fund plans to deploy a funding round on Arbitrum One geared towards the staking ecosystem in January, and the EF is excited to offer matching funds to the round. We hope you participate! Stay tuned for details. Yay public goods! We’ve been building on the shoulders of giants. Thank you to the clr.fund team, the MACI team & clr.fund’s community of contributors who continue to push innovations in the ZKP & quadratic funding space. What’s next? creating a learning hub to allow non-technical users to become proficient Ethereum usersbuilding additional resources on running nodes and staking to improve accessibilityfurther automating our translation pipeline to release translated content out fasterexpanding the Translation Program beyond ethereum.orgupdating content to transition away from the Eth2 terminology as the merge approaches How does that sound? We appreciate feedback on our roadmap. Our guiding principles are based on delivering the most value in the shortest time, so if there’s something you think we should work on, please let us know! We welcome ideas and contributions from anyone in the community. More on contributing Ipsilon Authored by Alex Beregszaszi We have created a team website to provide a clear explainer and to comprehensively list our current and past work. It is easy to tell from the following headers that in the second half of the year the team mostly focused on the EVM. It’s also important to mention that we have teamed up with the Geth Team to improve the performance of the EVM interpreter. EVM Object Format (EOF) The first step towards this, EIP-3541, went live with London and we have conducted a survey across many testnets and EVM chains to find a fitting prefix for EOF. Continued clarifications were made to EIP-3540 (including the chosen prefix), and we also proposed further work building on top of it: EIP-3670 to introduce code validation at deploy timeEIP-3690 to replace JUMPDEST opcodes with a JUMPDEST-tableEIP-4200 to introduce two new opcodes, RJUMP and RJUMPI, facilitating static jumps During October we presented EOF at Liscon (slides here, but the recording is not available) and at the Ethereum Meetup in Berlin (slides, recording). Other EIPs EIP-2681 (Limit account nonce to 2^64-1) One of our old proposals, EIP-2681, was accepted during ACD#120. It codifies a restriction, which was already (partially) implemented in practice in most clients. After acceptance we have extended the Ethereum State Tests suite and adjusted the geth implementation. EIP-3855 (PUSH0 instruction) EIP-3855 proposes to introduce a PUSH0 instruction which pushes 0 onto the stack. This is a frequently used feature, mostly accomplished today via inefficient or repurposed instructions. Our analysis found that substantial resources could have been saved with this opcode: To put the “waste” into perspective, across existing accounts 340,557,331 bytes are wasted on PUSH1 00 instructions, which means 68,111,466,200 gas was spent to deploy them. EIP-3860 (Limit and meter initcode) EIP-3860 is a proposal to set a boundary and introduce metering for initcode. This would allow for more optimised analysis and execution, because implementations would need to deal with less unknowns. geth As a collaboration with the Geth Team, we started to work on measuring and improving the performance of the EVM interpreter in geth. On the analysis side two reports are noteworthy: Geth vs evmone compares the speed of Geth and evmone using the benchmarking suite in evmone.Geth & Go compiler explores the effect of the Go compiler version on the speed of geth. Based on these initial results, we have looked into profiling geth, and finally contributing several improvements to the codebase, most of which has been already merged. A non-comprehensive list of relevant PRs: 23952, 23970, 23974, 23977, 24017, 24026, 24031, 24120. Follow this link to see every PR. We plan to continue this work in the next quarter. evmone Two bugfix releases of evmone were made: 0.8.1 and 0.8.2. ethash The team also maintains a C++ ethash/keccak256 library, which is used by evmone and Silkworm. The latest 0.8.0 release introduces a new method for verifying the final Ethash hashes against the block difficulty. This is both a usability and speed improvement. The method has been posted on Ethresear.ch. Additionally, ProgPoW has been deprecated in the library. Fizzy The team also participated in the Wasm in Web3 conference during September. We gave two presentations: Fizzy — A deterministic interpreter (slides) gave a comprehensive overview of what Fizzy is, how it…

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